Patients & Parents

Ingredients & Safety

Vaccine Overview & Information


Understanding How Vaccines Work Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention American Academy of Family Physicians American Academy of Pediatrics July 2018 | English | Vaccines Work! Immunization Action Coalition - January 2019 | English | The Journey of your Child's Vaccine - Infographic Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | English | Q&A Too Many Vaccines? What you should know The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia - Winter 2018 | English | Spanish | Combination Vaccines Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention American Academy of Family Physicians American Academy of Pediatrics May 2017 | English | ---ANALYZING VACCINE INFORMATION--- Reliable Sources of Immunization Information: Where Parents Can Go to Find Answers! Immunization Action Coalition - January 2017 | English | Evaluating Information: What you should know The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia - Summer 2017 | English | Logical Fallacies and Vaccines: What you should know The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia - Fall 2018 | English |




Vaccine Ingredients


Q&A Vaccine Ingredients: What you should know The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia - Summer 2016 | English | Spanish | Q&A Aluminum in Vaccines: What you should know The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia - Winter 2014 | English | Spanish | Q&A Thimerosal: What you should know The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia - Spring 2012 | English | Spanish | Understanding Thimerosal, Mercury, and Vaccine Safety Centers for Disease Control and Prevention U.S. Food and Drug Administration American Academy of Family Physicians American Academy of Pediatrics February 2013 | English | Science Summary: CDC Studies on Thimerosal in Vaccines Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | English | ---LEARN MORE--- Vaccines Ingredients The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia - Vaccine Education Center | Website |




Vaccine Safety & Surveillance


---VACCINE SAFETY--- Vaccine Safety and Your Child: Separating Fact from Fiction (33 pages) by Paul Offit, M.D., F.A.A.P., and Charlotte Moser The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia | English | Spanish | Ensuring the Safety of Vaccines in the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention U.S. Food and Drug Administration American Academy of Family Physicians American Academy of Pediatrics January 2018 | English | White Paper on Studying the Safety of the Childhood Immunization Schedule (64 pages) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | English | Understanding MMR Vaccine Safety Centers for Disease Control and Prevention American Academy of Family Physicians American Academy of Pediatrics February 2013 | English | Understanding Thimerosal, Mercury, and Vaccine Safety Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - July 2018 | English | Spanish | HPV Vaccine Safety and Effectiveness Centers for Disease Control and Prevention American Academy of Family Physicians American Academy of Pediatrics February 2013 | English | ---VACCINE SURVEILLANCE--- About the CDC Immunization Safety Office Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | English | Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS): A National Program for Monitoring Vaccine Safety Centers for Disease Control and Prevention U.S. Food and Drug Administration | English | Pamphlet - Report to VAERS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention U.S. Food and Drug Administration | English | Spanish |




Do Vaccines Cause That?


---AUTISM--- Q&A Vaccines and Autism: What you should know The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia - Spring 2016 | English | Spanish | MMR Vaccine does not cause Autism: Examine the Evidence Immunization Action Coalition - May 2017 | English | Science Summary: CDC Studies on Thimerosal in Vaccines Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | English | ---ALLERGIES--- Vaccines and Allergies: What you should know The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia - Spring 2018 | English | ---LEARN MORE--- Vaccines and Other Conditions The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia - Vaccine Education Center | Website |





Vaccines & Diseases

Measles


Measles is a highly contagious disease caused by the rubeola virus. Measles can be spread through direct contact with respiratory droplets or secretions from an infected individual and from entering a room within 2 hours after an unmasked, infected person was present. It is one of the most easily spread of all diseases. Measles ranges from a mild to a severe illness. Typical symptoms include fever, cough, runny nose, pink eye, rash, blue-white rash inside the mouth (Koplik spots) usually develop 10-12 days after exposure. Vaccine Information Statement: Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR) Vaccine Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - February 2018 | English | Spanish | Vaccine Information Statement: Measles, Mumps, Rubella, Varicella (MMRV) Vaccine Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - February 2018 | English | Spanish | Understanding MMR Vaccine Safety Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | English | Measles and the Vaccine (Shot) to Prevent It / El sarampión y la vacuna que lo previene Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - April 2017 | English | Spanish | Q&A Measles: What you should know The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia - Fall 2017 | English | Spanish | Measles: Q&A Information about the Disease and Vaccines Immunization Action Coalition - November 2018 | English | Meales, Mumps and Rubella - Make sure your child is protected! Immunization Action Coalition - June 2013 | English | Spanish |




Chickenpox (Varicella)


Chickenpox, also known as “Varicella,” is a highly contagious disease caused by the varicella virus that is spread through direct contact with or breathing in either (1) respiratory droplets or secretions from an infected individual or (2) fluid from the chickpox rash. It is a common childhood illness, but adults also get chickenpox. Typical symptoms include fever, fatigue, itching, and rash on the face, chest and back. The infection can be spread as early as 2 days before the rash starts.Most people who get sick after being exposed develop symptoms within 14-16 days. Vaccine Information Statement: Varicella (Chickenpox) Vaccine Centers for Disease Prevention and Control - February 2018 | English | Spanish | Chickenpox and the vaccine (shot) to prevent it Centers for Disease Prevention and Control American Academy of Family Physicians American Academy of Pediatrics April 2017 | English | Spanish | Q&A Chickenpox: What you should know The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia - Summer 2012 | English | Spanish | Q&A Varicella (Chickenpox): Information about the Disease and Vaccines Immunization Action Coalition | English | Chickenpox - Make sure your child is protected! Immunization Action Coalition | English | Spanish |




Polio


Vaccine Information Statement: Polio Vaccine Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - July 2016 | English | Spanish | Polio and the Vaccine (Shot) to Prevent it Centers for Disease Control and Prevention American Academy of Family Physicians American Acadamy of Pediatrics April 2017 | English | Spanish | Polio: Q&A Information about the Disease and Vaccines Immunization Action Coalition - May 2018 | English | Polio - Make sure your child is protected! Immunization Action Coalition - June 2013 | English | Spanish |




Pneumococcal


Vaccine Information Statement: Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV13) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - November 2015 | English | Spanish | Vaccine Information Statement: Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine (PPSV) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - April 2015 | English | Spanish | Pneumococcal Disease and the Vaccine (Shot) to Prevent it Centers for Disease Control and Prevention American Academy of Family Physicians American Acadamy of Pediatrics April 2017 | English | Spanish | Q&A Pneumococcus: What you should know The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia - Fall 2017 | English | Spanish | Pneumococcus: Q&A Information about the Disease and Vaccines Immunization Action Coalition - March 2016 | English | Protect yourself from pneumococcal disease - Get Vaccinated! Immunization Action Coalition - February 2015 | English | Spanish | Pneumococcal disease - Make sure your child is protected! Immunization Action Coalition - June 2013 | English | Spanish |




Hepatitis A


Hepatitis A is a viral illness that affects the liver and is spread through contact with objects, food, or drinks contaminated by fecal material of an infected person. Typical symptoms include fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting, dark-colored urine, light-colored stools, abdominal pain, joint pain, and jaundice (yellowing of the skin or whites of the eyes) that can appear 28-30 days after exposure. The infection can be mild, lasting a few weeks with few or no symptoms but can also be severe and last several months. Vaccine Information Statement: Hepatitis A Vaccine Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - July 2016 | English | Spanish | Hepatitis A Vaccine: Reasons to Consider Vaccination Immunization Action Coalition | English | Hepatitis A and the Vaccine (Shot) to Prevent it Centers for Disease Control and Prevention American Academy of Family Physicians American Acadamy of Pediatrics August 2018 | English | Spanish | Q&A Hepatitis A: What you should know The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia- Summer 2012 | English | Spanish | Hepatitis A: Q&A Information about the disease and vaccines Immunization Action Coalition | English | Hepatitis A is a Serious Liver Disease - Vaccination can protect you! Immunization Action Coalition | English | Hepatitis A - Make sure your child is protected! Immunization Action Coalition | English | Spanish | Protect yourself from Hepatitis A - Get vaccinated! Immunization Action Coalition | English | Spanish | Hepatitis A, B, and C: Learn the Differences Immunization Action Coalition | English |




Hepatitis B


Hepatitis B is a contagious liver disease that can range from a mild to a serious lifelong illness. Hepatitis B is spread through contact with blood or blood-containing bodily fluid from an infected individual or through sexual contact with an infected individual. Typical symptoms include fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, dark urine, light-colored stools, abdominal pain, fever, joint pain, yellowing of the skin or whites of the eyes (jaundice) usually appear 60-90 days after exposure. Chronic infection can lead to cirrhosis, liver failure, or liver cancer. The virus can survive outside the body for at least 7 days and still cause infection to an exposed indivudal. Vaccine Information Statement: Hepatitis B Vaccine Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - October 2018 | English | Spanish | Hepatitis B and the Vaccine (Shot) to Prevent it Centers for Disease Control and Prevention American Academy of Family Physicians American Acadamy of Pediatrics August 2018 | English | Spanish | Q&A Hepatitis B: What you should know The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia - Summer 2018 | English | Spanish | Hepatitis B Shots are Recommended for All New Babies Immunization Action Coalition - January 2019 | English | Spanish | Hepatitis B: Q&A Information about Disease and Vaccines Immunization Action Coalition - December 2017 | English | Questions Frequently asked about Hepatitis B Shots Immunization Action Coalition - August 2018 | English | Spanish | Protect yourself from Hepatitis B - Get Vaccinated! Immunization Action Coalition - May 2013 | English | Spanish | Hepatitis B - Make sure your child is protected! Immunization Action Coalition - June 2013 | English | Spanish |




Hib


Hib is a serious illness caused by the bacteria Haemophilus Influenzae type b and is prease through direct contact to respiratory drops from an infected individual. Typical symptoms include high fever, confusion, headache or stiff neck, pain from bright lights, poor eating, and vomiting. The most common form of Hib disease is Meningitis, which is an infection affect the linings of the brain or spinal cord. Children under the age of 5 years are at the highest risk for Hib disease and could cause lifelong disability or death. Vaccine Information Statement: Hib Vaccine Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - April 2015 | English | Spanish | Hib and the Vaccine (Shot) to Prevent it Centers for Disease Control and Prevention American Academy of Family Physicians American Acadamy of Pediatrics April 2017 | English | Spanish | Haemophilus Influenzae type b (Hib): Q&A Information about the Disease and Vaccines Immunization Action Coalition - April 2015 | English | Hib - Make sure your child is protected! Immunization Action Coalition - June 2013 | English | Spanish |




Human Papillomavirus (HPV)


Vaccine Information Statement: Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - December 2016 | English | Spanish | Human Papillomavirus (HPV): Q&A Information about the Disease and Vaccines Immunization Action Coalition - February 2017 | English | Frequently Asked Questions for Patients Concerning the HPV Vaccination The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists- April 2017 | English | Spanish | HPV Vaccine Safety and Effectiveness Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - July 2018 | English | Spanish | Q&A HPV: What you should know The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia - Winter 2016 | English | Spanish | Protect yourself from HPV - Get Vaccinated! Immunization Action Coalition - January 2017 | English | Spanish | HPV - Make sure your child is protected! Immunization Action Coalition - January 2017 | English | Spanish | HPV Vaccine for Preteens and Teens Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - June 2018 | English | Human Papillomavirus (HPV): A Parent's Guide to Preteen and Teen HPV Vaccination Immunization Action Coalition - January 2017 | English |




Meningococcal


Meningococcal disease is a bacterial infection that affect the linings of the brain or spinal cord (meningitis) and can get into the bloodstream (sepsis). Meningococcal disease can be spread through direct contact with secretions from the nose or mouth of an infected individual or living with an infected individual. Typical symptoms include severe headaches, fever, stiff neck, nausea, vomiting, sensitivity to light, and rash usually develop within 3-4 days after exposure. It can be life-threatening and require quick medical attention. Vaccine Information Statement: Meningococcal ACWY Vaccine Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - August 2018 | English | Spanish | Vaccine Information Statement: Serogroup B Meningococcal (MenB) Vaccine Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - August 2016 | English | Spanish | Meningococcal Vaccination: Diseases and the Vaccines that Prevent them Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - November 2015 | English | Spanish | Q&A Meningococcus: What you should know The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia - Winter 2016 | English | Spanish | Meningococcal: Q&A Information about the Disease and Vaccines Immunization Action Coalition - May 2018 | English | Protect yourself from Meningococcal disease - Get Vaccinated! Immunization Action Coalition - September 2016 | English | Spanish | Meningococal disease - Make sure your child is protected! Immunization Action Coalition - September 2016 | English | Spanish |




Rotavirus


Vaccine Information Statement: Rotavirus Vaccine Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - February 2018 | English | Spanish | Rotavirus and the Vaccine (Shot) to Prevent it Centers for Disease Control and Prevention American Academy of Family Physicians American Acadamy of Pediatrics April 2017 | English | Spanish | Q&A Rotavirus: What you should know The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia - Winter 2012 | English | Spanish | Rotavirus: Q&A Information about the Disease and Vaccines Immunization Action Coalition - January 2019 | English | Rotavirus - Make sure your child is protected! Immunization Action Coalition - June 2013 | English | Spanish |




Shingles


Shingles, also known as “Zoster” or “Herpes Zoster,” is caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox (Varicella). Once a person recovers from chickenpox, the virus remains in the body and can later cause shingles and is spread through direct contact with fluid from the shingles rash during blister-phase. Typical symptoms include itching, pain or tingling in same area where rash will develop 2-4 days later, with most people developin symptoms 14-16 days after exposure, Shingles usually causes a rash on one side of the body and involves an area of skin supplied by one nerve, called a “dermatome.” Rarely, shingles can involve more than one dermatome, called disseminated shingles. Vaccine Information Statement: Shingles Recombinant Zoster (RZV) Vaccine Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - February 2018 | English | Spanish | Vaccine Information Statement: Shingles Live Zoster (ZVL) Vaccine Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - February 2018 | English | Spanish | Q&A Shingles: What you should know The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia - Winter 2017 | English | Spanish | Shingles (Zoster): Q&A Information about the Disease and Vaccines Immunization Action Coalition - February 2018 | English | Protect yourself from Shingles: Get Vaccinated! Immunization Action Coalition - May 2018 | English | Spanish |