ADMINISTERING VACCINES

A wide variety of professionals serve their community through vaccination.  It is a broad clinical area and includes many specialty areas and unique patient populations.  In a hectic and demanding profession, Immunize Oregon collects  the most current immunization resources, best practices, and recommendations.

Immunize Oregon brings together our network of over 600 coalition participants to ensure that the most accurate and current immunization information is available to anyone in our state.   

GUIDELINES & TRAINING

Created by experts dedicated to enhancing community health and identifying best practices using scientific research data

Intramuscular (IM) Injection supplies for Adults


Administering Vaccines: Dose, Route, Site, and Needle Size Immunization Action Coalition - October 2018 | Guide - 1 page | Administering Vaccines to Adults: Dose, Route, Site, and Needle Size Immunization Action Coalition - October 2018 | Guide - 1 page | Provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
This training addresses how to select the equipment needed to prepare an intramuscular (IM) injection for adults 19 years of age and older. A supply of needles of the appropriate lengths should be available. Aseptic technique must be used to protect supplies from microbial contamination. Safe injection practices minimize risk of injuries, infections, and non-infectious adverse events for both patients and providers. Health care providers are always advised to observe patients for 15 minutes after vaccination.




Contraindications & Precautions


Before you vaccinate adults, Consider their H-A-L-O Immunization Action Coalition - April 2018 | Guide - 1 page | Guide to Contraindications and Precautions to Commonly Used Vaccines | Immunization Action Coalition - Sept 2018 | World Health Organization - April 2012 |




Single-Dose Vial


Provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention This training addresses how to prepare vaccine from a single-dose vial. A single-dose vial contains one dose and should be administered one time to one patient. CDC recommends that providers only prepare and draw up any vaccine just prior to administration.




Multidose Vial (MDV)


Provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention This training addresses how to prepare vaccine from a multidose vial (MDV), which contains more than one dose of vaccine. CDC recommends that providers only prepare and draw up any vaccine just prior to administration.




Manufacturer-filled Syringe: Assemble


Provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention This training addresses how to assemble a manufacturer-filled syringe, available for a variety of vaccines. CDC recommends that providers only prepare vaccines just prior to administration. Always prepare vaccines in a designated area that is not near any area where potentially contaminated items are placed.




Subcutaneous (SC) Injections: Administration


How to Administer Subcutaneous (SC) Injections Immunization Action Coalition | Guide - 1 page | Administering Vaccines: Dose, Route, Site, and Needle Size Immunization Action Coalition - October 2018 | Guide - 1 page | Administering Vaccines to Adults: Dose, Route, Site, and Needle Size Immunization Action Coalition - October 2018 | Guide - 1 page | Provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention This training addresses how to administer a subcutaneous (SC or subcut) injection. Injections are commonly used in health care settings to administer vaccines for disease prevention. A needle is used to inject the vaccine into the tissue layer between the skin and the muscle. Safe injection practices minimize risk of injuries, infections, and non-infectious adverse events for both patients and providers. Health care providers are always advised to observe patients for 15 minutes after vaccination. ​​​​​​​




Subcutaneous (SC) Injection: Supplies


Administering Vaccines: Dose, Route, Site, and Needle Size Immunization Action Coalition - October 2018 | Guide - 1 page | Administering Vaccines to Adults: Dose, Route, Site, and Needle Size Immunization Action Coalition - October 2018 | Guide - 1 page | Provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention This training addresses how to select the equipment needed to prepare for a subcutaneous (SC or subcut) injection. Aseptic technique must be used to protect vaccines, injection equipment, and supplies from microbial contamination. Safe and sterile injection practices minimize risk of injuries, infections, and non-infectious adverse events for both patients and providers.




Subcutaneous (SC) Injection Sites


How to Administer Subcutaneous (SC) Injections Immunization Action Coalition | Guide - 1 page | Administering Vaccines: Dose, Route, Site, and Needle Size Immunization Action Coalition - October 2018 | Guide - 1 page | Administering Vaccines to Adults: Dose, Route, Site, and Needle Size Immunization Action Coalition - October 2018 | Guide - 1 page | ​​​​​​​ Provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention This training helps providers identify subcutaneous (SC or subcut) injection sites. A needle is used to inject the vaccine into the tissue layer between the skin and the muscle. The appropriate site for a subcutaneous injection for those under 12 months of age is the fatty tissue over the anterolateral thigh. The fatty tissue over the triceps area of the upper arm is preferred for those older than 12 months of age. Safe injection practices minimize risk of injuries, infections, and non-infectious adverse events for both patients and providers. Health care providers are always advised to observe patients for 15 minutes after vaccination. ​​​​​​​




Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine (LAIV)


Administering Vaccines: Dose, Route, Site, and Needle Size Immunization Action Coalition - October 2018 | Guide - 1 page | Administering Vaccines to Adults: Dose, Route, Site, and Needle Size Immunization Action Coalition - October 2018 | Guide - 1 page | Provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention This training addresses how to administer FluMist, the live, attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV). FluMist is the only vaccine administered by the intranasal route. Influenza (flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness and result in serious outcomes such as hospitalization or death. The annual recommendation for influenza vaccination for children and adults means that health care providers should stay up to date in their knowledge of influenza vaccination recommendations. The best way to prevent the flu is to get vaccinated each year. ​​​​​​​




Documenting Vaccinations


Provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention This training addresses how to accurately document vaccinations after administration as required by the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act (NCVIA). Vaccine doses should be documented in both a medical record and immunization information system (IIS). Proper documentation using an IIS can help consolidate vaccination records for patients, lessen the possibility that patients will receive unnecessary doses of vaccines, and provide data for calculating a practice’s vaccination coverage. Health care providers should also give patients, parents, and/or guardians a personal vaccination record that includes the names and dates of vaccines administered.




Intramuscular (IM) Injection Sites


How to Administer Intramuscular (IM) Injections Immunization Action Coalition | Guide - 1 page | Administering Vaccines: Dose, Route, Site, and Needle Size Immunization Action Coalition - October 2018 | Guide - 1 page | Administering Vaccines to Adults: Dose, Route, Site, and Needle Size Immunization Action Coalition - October 2018 | Guide - 1 page | Provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention This training helps providers identify intramuscular (IM) injection sites. A needle is used to inject the vaccine into the muscle. The appropriate site for an intramuscular injection for those under 2 years of age is the vastus lateralis muscle. The deltoid muscle over the triceps area of the upper arm is preferred for persons 3 years of age and older. Safe injection practices minimize risk of injuries, infections, and non-infectious adverse events for both patients and providers. Health care providers are always advised to observe patients for 15 minutes after vaccination ​​​​​​​




Intramuscular (IM) Injection supplies for Children


Administering Vaccines: Dose, Route, Site, and Needle Size Immunization Action Coalition - October 2018 | Guide - 1 page | Provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
This training addresses how to select the equipment needed to prepare an intramuscular (IM) injection for children from birth through 18 years of age. A supply of needles of the appropriate lengths should be available. Aseptic technique must be used to protect supplies from microbial contamination. Safe injection practices minimize risk of injuries, infections, and non-infectious adverse events for both patients and providers. Health care providers are always advised to observe patients for 15 minutes after vaccination.





coordinator@immunizeOR.org  |  503-413-4167

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